Search this website


Sponsored by ...
Beef Reproduction Task Force

Beef Reproduction Task Force

University of California-Davis

UC Davis Animal Science

UC Davis Animal Science

Visit the sites in
the Angus Journal®
Virtual Library ...

The topic sites in our library offer portals to information on body condition scoring, beef cow efficiency, country-of-origin labeling, feeding & feedstuffs and more.
Click here.

Angus Journal
event sites ...

Sign up for...

Angus Journal
Copyright © 2015
Angus Journal


Speakers


Quick Links: Scott Brown | Joseph Dalton | Rick Funston | Rod Hall | John Hall | Peter Hansen | Sandy Johnson | David Lalman | Clifford Lamb | David Patterson | George Perry | Megan Rolf | Michael Smith | Matt Spangler | Daniel Stein | Brad Stroud | Jerry Taylor | Alison Van Eenennaam | Roger Wann | Robert Wettemann |

Scott Brown

Scott Brown

Scott Brown

Scott is a research assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics at the University of Missouri. In this role, Scott has worked with the United States Congress over the past two decades in determining the quantitative effects of changes in dairy and livestock policies and has testified regarding dairy and livestock policy issues before House and Senate Agriculture committees. He has also worked on the economic effects of industry-led programs such as the Cooperatives Working Together (CWT) that currently operates in the dairy industry. Scott is investigating the economic effects of the adoption of new technologies in the cattle industry that can increase the supply of high-quality cattle. Scott received his doctorate in agricultural economics from the University of Missouri and his bachelor’s degree in agricultural business from Northwest Missouri State University. He grew up on a diversified farm in northwest Missouri.

Joseph C. Dalton

Joseph C. Dalton

Joseph C. Dalton

Joseph C. Dalton is a professor and extension dairy specialist in Animal and Veterinary Science at the University of Idaho. He received his doctorate from Virginia Tech. Dalton’s research in applied male and female reproductive physiology focuses on factors important to increasing the efficiency of artificial insemination (AI) in cattle. Dalton’s extension program emphasizes the enhancement of reproductive efficiency in cattle. He has given presentations at conferences throughout the United States, Canada, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Ireland and the Philippines.

Rick Funston

Rick Funston

Rick Funston

Rick Funston is currently working with the University of Nebraska’s West Central Research and Extension Center as a reproductive physiologist. He obtained his bachelor’s degree from North Dakota State University, master’s degree from Montana State University and doctorate at the University of Wyoming. Funston’s research interests include heifer development and rebreeding first-calf heifers. Prior to working with the University of Nebraska, Funston was an extension beef specialist with Montana State University, an assistant professor in animal science at Chadron State College and a post-doctoral fellow with Colorado State University’s Department of Physiology from 1993 until 1995. He received the Director’s Award for Excellence for leadership in the Montana Beef Network.

Rod Hall

Rod Hall

Rod Hall

Rod Hall was raised on small beef and dairy farm near Ada, Okla. He did his prevet work at East Central University in Ada and graduated with a doctorate of veterinary medicine from Oklahoma State University in 1977. He practiced in Alva, Okla., for one year before opening a mixed animal practice in Tishomingo, Okla., in 1978. His practice in Tishomingo was a fairly even mix of bovine and small animal with generous doses of equine, porcine, ovine and caprine.

He joined Animal Industry Services in the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry in December 2006. As a staff veterinarian he worked mainly with the brucellosis, tuberculosis, trichomoniasis, Johne’s Disease, aquaculture, and Livestock Market Inspection programs. He was named state veterinarian in June 2011.

He has been married to Catherine for 37 years and is the proud father of sons Joe and Mark, as well as daughters-in-law Staci and Sara. He has a 7-year-old granddaughter named Ainsley and twin granddaughters Maddox and Sawyer.

John B. Hall

John Hall

John Hall

John Hall received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in animal science from the University of Georgia. He obtained his doctorate in animal science (reproductive physiology) from the University of Kentucky in 1991. Currently, he is professor and extension beef cattle specialist located at the University of Idaho Nancy M. Cummings Research, Extension and Education Center where he also serves as the station superintendent.

Prior to coming to Idaho, Hall was on faculty at the University of Minnesota and Virginia Tech.

His role is to conduct research and extension programs on beef reproduction and beef cow-calf systems. His particular interests are in estrus-synchronization systems, use of gender-selected semen, nutrition reproduction interactions and utilization of forages.

John is a seventh-generation agriculturalist, and resides in Carmen, Idaho, with his wife. They have two adult sons.

Peter J. Hansen

Peter J. Hansen

Peter J. Hansen

Peter J. Hansen is a distinguished professor and L.E. “Red” Larson professor of animal sciences in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Florida. His research interests center around the basic mechanisms controlling the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy and development of methods to improve fertility. Particular emphasis is placed on elucidating effects of elevated temperature on early embryonic development; identifying genes controlling embryonic survival; and characterizing interactions between the immune system, the reproductive tract and the embryo. Another focus is on development of methods to increase profitable uses of embryo transfer.

Hansen joined the faculty at Florida as an assistant professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine in 1984 and transferred to the Dairy Science Department (now Animal Sciences) in 1986. His formal education was at the University of Illinois and University of Wisconsin. He received postdoctoral training in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Florida and spent a sabbatical leave at the University of Guelph. He currently serves as president of the International Congress of Animal Reproduction and is past president of the American Society for Reproductive Immunology and the International Embryo Transfer Society.

Sandy Johnson

Sandy Johnson

Sandy Johnson

Sandy Johnson was raised on a diversified livestock farm north of Blair, Neb. She received a bachelor’s degree in animal science from the University of Nebraska in 1982 and a master’s degree in reproductive physiology from the University of Missouri in 1984. A deep appreciation for applied integrated research was developed during three years spent working as a research technician at the University of Nebraska West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte.

A move to West Virginia was made to pursue a doctoral degree. Her dissertation examined the role of the follicle in the formation of short-lived corpora lutea in postpartum beef cows. Sandy received her doctorate from West Virginia University in reproductive physiology in 1991 and continued there as a postdoctoral fellow until 1993. She held a teaching position at Fort Hays State University before beginning her current position in October of 1998 as extension livestock specialist at the Northwest Research and Extension Center in Colby, Kan.

Sandy is a member of the North Central Region Bovine Reproductive Task Force, which has hosted the Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle workshops, updated the Estrus-Synchronization Planner and organized the Beef Cattle Reproduction Leadership Team. Her research interests include the areas of estrus synchronization, costs of breeding systems and cow-calf management.

David Lalman

David Lalman

David Lalman

David Lalman is currently a professor and extension beef cattle specialist at Oklahoma State University. His main extension duty is to develop programs for cattle nutrition and management, with an emphasis in beef cattle production system profitability and product quality through nutritional and management strategies.

Lalman earned his bachelor’s degree at Kansas State University, master’s degree in ruminant nutrition from Montana State University, and doctorate in ruminant nutrition from the University of Missouri.

G. Clifford Lamb

G. Clifford Lamb

G. Clifford Lamb

G. Clifford Lamb is currently the assistant director and professor at the North Florida Research and Education Center at the University of Florida. He received his bachelor’s degree in Animal Science from Middle Tennessee State University in 1992. He completed the requirements for the master’s and doctoral degrees at Kansas State University in 1996 and 1998, respectively. His primary research efforts focus on applied reproductive physiology in cattle emphasizing synchronization of estrus in replacement heifers and postpartum cows.

In 2013, Lamb and six colleagues received the USDA-NIFA Partnership Award for Multistate Efforts for their Extension efforts in reproductive management. He was also recently awarded the University of Florida Research Foundation Professorship, received the Florida Association of County Agricultural Agents Specialist of the Year Award, and was named University of Florida Department of Animal Science Graduate Student Mentor Awardee.

David Patterson

David Patterson

David Patterson

David Patterson is an extension educator in reproductive management at the University of Missouri. He is a member of the faculty in the Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri–Columbia. Patterson, a native of Montana, completed his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Montana State University. Research for his master’s was conducted at the Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory in Miles City, Mont. He received his doctorate in reproductive physiology from Kansas State University.

Patterson’s research efforts have gained wide industry acceptance and resulted in new strategies to synchronize estrous cycles of postpartum beef cows and replacement beef heifers. His research program has received funding for the past 10 years from USDA’s National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program in Animal Reproduction and led to the development of four progestin-based protocols to facilitate fixed-time artificial insemination in beef heifers and cows.

Patterson led the development of Missouri’s Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program, which is the first comprehensive, statewide, on-farm beef heifer development and marketing program in the United States.

George Perry

George Perry

George Perry

George Perry is a professor in beef reproductive management at South Dakota State University. Perry was raised in south-central Texas on a small cattle operation. He received his bachelor’s degree in animal science from Texas A&M University. He obtained a master’s degree and a doctoral degree in reproductive physiology from the University of Missouri, with a large portion of his doctoral research conducted at the USDA research station in Miles City, Mont.

Perry joined the faculty of South Dakota State University in August 2003. He serves as a professor and the beef extension specialist in reproductive physiology. His research efforts are in the area of factors that influence reproductive efficiency and pregnancy success. Some of his current research has focused on understanding why variation occurs between herds with fixed-time AI protocols.

Megan Rolf

Megan Rolf

Megan Rolf

Megan Rolf, Ph.D., joined the faculty of the Department of Animal Sciences at Oklahoma State University in June of 2012 as Assistant Professor of Beef Cattle Management and State Beef Cattle Extension Specialist. Her extension goals are to increase awareness and understanding of genetic and genomic selection tools within the beef industry.

She earned her bachelor’s degree in Animal Science with a science option at Kansas State University in 2005. She worked in the school of veterinary medicine where she was introduced to immunology and virology wet lab research while completing her animal science honors program research related to cytoplasmic inheritance. Megan relocated to Columbia, MO to pursue a master’s degree in Animal Science at the University of Missouri, with a focus on use of SNP data to generate genomic relationship matrices. She also examined the use of model predicted feed intakes in tandem with genomic data for the improvement of feed efficiency. After completion of her master’s degree she pursued a doctorate in Genetics at the University of Missouri, with a research focus on the exploration of methods to separate training and validation populations for improving across-breed genomic selection models for carcass traits.

Michael F. Smith

Michael F. Smith

Michael F. Smith

Michael F. Smith received his bachelor’s degree from Colorado State University and master’s and doctoral degrees from Texas A&M University under the direction of Jim Wiltbank. He joined the Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri in 1980. He is a professor of animal sciences, and his academic responsibilities include teaching and research. He served as the interim director of the Division of Animal Sciences from 2001 to 2006.

The long-range goal of his research program is to increase reproductive efficiency in cattle. Smith and his graduate students are trying to better understand the mechanisms regulating ovarian follicular maturation, ovulation, corpus luteum function, and the establishment/maintenance of pregnancy in beef cattle. He also works closely with Dave Patterson on the development of economical and effective methods for timed insemination in beef heifers and cows.

Matt Spangler

Matt Spangler

Matt Spangler

Matt Spangler grew up on a diversified crop and livestock farm in south-central Kansas where his family still farms and has a cow-calf operation. After receiving his bachelor’s degree in animal science from Kansas State University in 2001, he attended Iowa State University and received his master’s degree in animal breeding and genetics in 2003. He received his doctorate at the University of Georgia in animal breeding and genetics in 2006 and is currently an associate professor and extension beef genetics specialist at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (UNL).

He works as part of a collaborative team with colleagues at UNL and U.S. Meat Animal Research Center to develop and evaluate methods related to genomic selection and is currently part of a collaborative effort funded by the USDA competitive grants program to develop genomic predictors for feed intake and efficiency in beef cattle.

Daniel "Dan" Stein

Daniel Stein

Daniel Stein

Dan Stein was raised on a family ranching operation in northwest Oklahoma and graduated with a bachelor's degree from Northwestern Oklahoma State University. He then joined the Stein Angus Farm family partnership and for three decades bred and marketed registered-Angus cattle. In 2002, due to health reasons, Stein’s father and uncle retired, and the Angus herd was dispersed. Stein began his graduate program in animal science at Oklahoma State University in the fall of that year. 

Stein completed both his master's degree in reproductive physiology and his doctorate in animal breeding and reproduction at OSU. He accepted his current position in the OSU Department of Animal Science in the fall of 2009 as an assistant professor with an 80% teaching and a 20% extension appointment. He is currently teaching courses in animal reproduction and introduction to animal science with his extension emphasis in the area of reproduction. Stein is a faculty advisor for CASNR Freshman in Transition (FIT) Living Community, as well as a co-advisor for the OSU Collegiate Cattleman Association and the Animal Science Undergraduate Research Scholars Program.

Stein has been honored with the OSU Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources Outstanding Student Advisor Award, the Alpha Zeta Outstanding Teacher Award, the OSU University Award for Excellence for Student Advisement, the Greek Community Outstanding Faculty Member Award, the OSU Faculty “Keep the Ladder Down” Award, the Mortar Board Golden Torch Award as the Outstanding Faculty Member in the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources, the CASNR Excellence in Student Advising and Mentor Award, and the Oklahoma Honorary State FFA Degree.

Brad Stroud

Brad Stroud

Brad Stroud

Veterinarian Brad Stroud received a doctor of veterinary medicine (DVM) degree from Texas A&M University in 1979. He spent the next year as a large-animal ambulatory intern at The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

In the fall of 1980, Stroud and his wife, Mendee, established Stroud Veterinary Embryo Services in his hometown of Weatherford, Texas. His practice has been limited to bovine embryo transfer and reproduction for the last 34 years.

Jerry Taylor

Jerry Taylor

Jerry Taylor

Jerry Taylor is a Curators’ Distinguished Professor of animal sciences and of genetics and holds the Wurdack Chair in animal genomics in the Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri–Columbia. He is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and received the 2014 President’s Faculty Award for Sustained Career Excellence from the University of Missouri System.

He is a member of the Bovine Genomics Consortium, which developed the Illumina BovineSNP50 assay for which the team won the 2008 USDA Technology Transfer Award, the 2009 FLC Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer and the 2010 USDA Secretary’s Honors Award.

Taylor has served on the Scientific Advisory Board for Sigma-Aldrich Biotechnology in St. Louis, Mo., and currently serves on the NSF Plant Genome project “Expanding the Medicago truncatula Hapmap as a Platform for Exploring the Genetics of Legume Symbioses” advisory board and the Business and Scientific Advisory Boards of Recombinetics Inc. and Intrepid Bioinformatics. Prior to joining the University of Missouri in 2002, he was director of genomics at RTI International in the Research Triangle Park, N.C.

Prior to this, he was cofounder, board member and a senior executive of GenomicFX an agricultural biotechnology company located in Austin, Texas. From 1986 to 2000, he was an associate and then professor in the Faculty of Genetics and Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University. He began his academic career as an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Tropical Veterinary Science at James Cook University in Townsville, Queensland. Jerry received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and a bachelor’s honor degree in mathematical statistics from the University of Adelaide and a doctorate in Quantitative Genetics from the University of New England in Australia.

Alison Van Eenennaam

Alison Van Eenennaam

Alison Van Eenennaam

Alison Van Eenennaam is a cooperative extension specialist in the field of animal genomics and biotechnology in the Department of Animal Science at University of California–Davis (UC-Davis). She received a bachelor of agricultural science from the University of Melbourne in Australia, and both a master’s degree in animal science and a doctorate in Genetics from UC–Davis. The mission of her extension program is “to provide research and education on the use of animal genomics and biotechnology in livestock production systems.”

Van Eenennaam works particularly with the beef cattle industry and has developed a variety of extension programming for producers on topics ranging from marker-assisted and whole-genome enabled selection to genetic engineering and cloning. Van Eenennaam was the recipient of the 2010 National Award for Excellence in Extension from the American Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities; the 2014 American Society of Animal Science National Extension Award; and the 2014 Borlaug CAST Communication Award.

Roger Wann

Roger Wann

Roger Wann

Roger Wann has been a sales manager for ABS Global Inc. since June 1988. He is responsible for beef AI and semen sales in Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana and New Mexico.

During his 26-year career, he has helped customers manage reproduction within herds ranging from very small to as large as 10,000 head. He has spoken extensively on the subjests of genetic improvement, artificial insemination, calving season management and reproductictive management of beef cattle.

Wann earned a bachelor's animal science from Oklahoma State University in 1985 and a master's in physiology of reproduction from Texas A&M University in 1988.

Raised on a four-generation family commercial-cattle ranch in eastern Oklahoma, Wann partnered with his father and brother in a registered-Angus herd in 1989. The operation is progressive in its use of information and reproductive management on the 250-cow herd.

He and his wife, Dawn, have four children — daughter Britney and sons Nathan, Jace and Logan.

Robert Wettemann

Robert Wettemann

Robert Wettemann

Robert Wettemann is a regents professor at Oklahoma State University. His primary research interests include reproduction and endocrine function of beef cattle, identification of beef cows that require less energy for maintenance of body weight, and the effects of prenatal nutrition on postnatal growth and development. Wettemann’s current research involves identifying cattle that are more efficient and require less energy for body weight maintenance. He received his bachelor’s degree at the University of Connecticut, master’s degree and doctorate at Michigan State University.