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Quick Links: Mark Allan | Catalina Cabrera | Fernando Campos-Chillon | Joseph Dalton | Rick Funston | John Hall | Michael Hall | Sandy Johnson | Brian Kinghorn | Clifford Lamb | Larry Lanzon | James Lauderdale | Bret McNabb | David Patterson | George Perry | Pablo Juan Ross | Eric Scholljegerdes | Michael Smith | Jeffrey Stott | Alison Van Eenennaam | Vish Vishwanath | Bryan Welly

Mark Allan

Mark Allan

Mark Allan

Dr. Mark F. Allan presently serves as the director of marketing and genomics for Trans Ova Genetics, Sioiux Center, Iowa. In this role he oversees all marketing, genomic and new product development activities.

Allan earned his undergraduate animal science degree from the University of Nebraska. Upon graduation and for the next seven years, he established a career in the beef industry, working directly with purebred cow-calf production. He returned to graduate school at the University of Nebraska, and studied mouse models to understand the genetic basis of energy metabolism and response of correlated traits in livestock species. In 2000, he developed and taught the inaugural Applications of Biotechnology in Livestock Class at Cal Poly, in San Luis Obispo, Calif.

Upon earning his doctorate from the University of Nebraska, Allan served as a research geneticist for the USDA’s Agricultural Research Service at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (2003-2008) in Clay Center, Neb. In that position, he provided leadership in DNA mapping of production traits in beef cattle, with a large portion of his work focused on feed efficiency and reproductive performance. Allan served as a member of the group of scientists that brought the first bovine 50K genomic chip to market.

Allan served as the associate director of global technical services for Pfizer Animal Health–Genetics from 2008-2011. He was instrumental in the development and launch of Pfizer’s Angus HD 50K, a high-density DNA tool enabling genetic improvement in Angus cattle, and the Dairy Clarified DNA tool, which has resulted in the application of genomic technology in the commercial dairy sector.

He has been the recipient of multiple industry awards, including being named as one of the “Top Ten Industry Leaders Under 40” by Cattle Business Weekly and receiving the Trail Blazers Teachers and Researchers honor from the American Angus Journal. Allan has also been honored by the University of Nebraska, having accepted the Milton Mohr Teaching Fellowship Award and the Jon Holling Distinguished Teaching Award. Additionally, Allan has been recognized by Pfizer Animal Health with special awards for outstanding teaching and support of the Pfizer Animal Health work force. From 2006-2011 he served as an adjunct faculty member of the University of Nebraska Animal Science Department. Allan has given numerous invited symposium talks in North America and abroad. Allan and Alise are the proud parents of Kiley (12) and Brady (9).

Catalina Cabrera

Catalina Cabrera

Catalina Cabrera

Dr. Catalina Cabrera graduated from the Universidad Nacional de Colombia in 2003. She worked at a private practice with bovine embryos for four years in Uruguay, and attended advance courses in Bovine Reproduction at the Universidad of Cordoba, Argentina. Dr. Cabrera moved to the United States in 2008, where she completed a residency in Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction and a Masters in Preventive Veterinary Medicine in 2011 at UC Davis. At present, she is an associate veterinarian at the Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction Service and specializes in reproductive management, artificial insemination, embryo transfer and male and female reproductive evaluation and infertility.

Fernando Campos-Chillon

Campos-Chillon

Fernando
Campos-Chillon

Fernando is originally from Bogota, Colombia and was involved in his family’s cattle operations from an early age. Obtaining his BS and MS degrees in Animal Science from Cal Poly Pomona, he chose an emphasis in reproductive physiology. After receiving his DVM and PhD in Biomedical Sciences at Colorado State University, he obtained board certification in the American College of Theriogenologists.

Fernando’s teaching and research emphasis has been in assisted reproduction technologies (ART) of cattle and horses. He currently leads the comparative ART program at Cal Poly involving technologies of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), embryo transfer and cryopreservation, genetic analysis and general reproductive management.

Joseph Dalton

Joseph Dalton

Joseph Dalton

Dr. Joseph C. Dalton is a professor and Extension dairy specialist in Animal and Veterinary Science at the University of Idaho. He received his doctorate degree from Virginia Tech. Dalton’s research in applied male and female reproductive physiology focuses on factors important to increasing the efficiency of artificial insemination (AI) in cattle. Dalton’s extension program emphasizes the enhancement of reproductive efficiency in cattle. Dalton has given presentations at conferences throughout the United States, Canada, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Ireland and the Philippines. Dalton serves as the current president of the Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council.

Rick Funston

Rick Funston

Rick Funston

Dr. RickFunston is a professor and Reproductive Physiologist at the University of Nebraska. He received his bachelor of science degree from North Dakota State University, master of science dgree from Montana State University, his doctorate from the University of Wyoming, and completed a post doc at Colorado State University in reproduction/biotechnology. He divides his time between extension and research.

His research on lighter heifer development is receiving national attention/adoption; research on fetal-programming effects on postnatal calf performance including carcass characteristics and reproduction has received national and international recognition; and he is a team member of nationally recognized beef systems research. In the extension capacity, he provides leadership and subject matter expertise for educational programs in cow-calf production management for the West Central District and statewide expertise in beef reproductive management programs.

John Hall

John Hall

John Hall

Dr. Hall received his B.S.A. and M.S. in Animal Science from the University of Georgia. He obtained his Ph.D. in Animal Science (Reproductive Physiology) from the University of Kentucky in 1991. Currently, he is Professor and Extension Beef Cattle Specialist located at the University of Idaho Nancy M. Cummings Research, Extension, and Education Center where he also serves as the station Superintendent. Prior to coming to Idaho, Dr. Hall was on faculty at the University of Minnesota and Virginia Tech. His role is to conduct research and extension programs on beef reproduction and beef cow-calf systems. His particular interests are in estrus synchronization systems, use of gender selected semen, heifer development, nutrition reproduction interactions, and utilization of forages. John is a seventh generation agriculturalist, and resides in Carmen, ID with his wife. They have two adult sons.

Michael Hall

John Hall

Michael Hall

Mike Hall retired from Cal Poly–San Luis Obispo in January 2012 after teaching at the university for 39 years. Hall was the senior beef cattle specialist for the animal science department where he was in charge of the beef cattle program at Cal Poly and the Cal Poly Bull Test. He earned his bachelor’s degree in animal science at Cal Poly and his master’s degree in animal science with a concentration in animal breeding and genetics at Kansas State University.

Hall managed all aspects of Cal Poly's beef cattle program purebred beef herd and conducted research in the area of resource management. In addition to managing the purebred cattle herd, Hall was the advisor to the bull test enterprise, artificial insemination enterprise and heifer calving enterprise. Hall's interest in grazing management has led him to involvement with University of California at Santa Barbara, researching the effects of high intensity-short duration grazing on regeneration of valley and coast live oak on the Central Coast.

He worked closely with state and federal resource agencies to determine management measures and practices to improve the quality of California rangeland. In addition to resource management, his professional interests include judging, ultrasound, beef cattle systems and animal behavior issues. Hall also acted as an advisor to both the Southern Region Young Cattlemen's Association and Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity.

Hall served on the board of directors for the North American Limousin Foundation where he served for six years and four years on the executive committee. Through his work with the Limousin Association, Hall got to know Jerry Wulf and Wulf Cattle. Shortly following retirement, Mike Hall became the West Coast Representative for Wulf Cattle headquartered in Morris, Minn. Hall assists in marketing Limousin genetics to both beef and dairy operations throughout the West Coast. Most specifically, he helps promote Wulf Cattle’s Breeding to Feeding Program, which is the breeding of Limousin to dairy cows to produce an ideal feedlot and carcass animal.

Sandy Johnson

Sandy Johnson

Sandy Johnson

Dr. Sandy Johnson is an Extension Livestock Specialist for Kansas State University (K-State) Research and Extension located at the Northwest Research and Extension Center in Colby. Johnson was raised on a diversified livestock farm in northeast Nebraska and received a bachelor of science degree in animal science from the University of Nebraska. She went on to receive a master of science degree from the University of Missouri and a doctorate degree from West Virginia University, both in reproductive physiology. She held a teaching position at Fort Hays State University before beginning her current position with Kansas State University in 1998.

Johnson conducts research and extension programs in the areas of estrus synchronization, breeding systems and cow-calf management. She provides leadership for the Beef Program Focus Team. Johnson is a member of the Beef Reproductive Task Force whose multi-state efforts were recognize by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) in the form of the 2013 Partnership Award for Multistate efforts.

Brian Kinghorn

Brian Kinghorn

Brian Kinghorn

Brian Kinghorn is Emeritus Professor of Quantitative Genetics at the University of New England in Australia. He has a lifetime of experience in research, teaching and consulting to industry. His research includes use of genomics to improve animal breeding programs and development of tactical systems to integrate animal breeding theories into decision systems for implementing breeding programs.

G. Clifford Lamb

G. Clifford Lamb

G. Clifford Lamb

G. Cliff Lamb is currently the assistant director and professor at the North Florida Research and Education Center at the University of Florida. He received his bachelor of science in animal science from Middle Tennessee State University in 1992. He completed the requirements for the master of science and doctorate degrees at Kansas State University in 1996 and 1998, respectively. His primary research efforts focus on applied reproductive physiology in cattle emphasizing synchronization of estrus in replacement heifers and postpartum cows.

In 2013, Dr. Lamb and six colleagues received the USDA NIFA Partnership Award for Multistate Efforts for their Extension efforts in reproductive management. He also was recently awarded the University of Florida Research Foundation Professorship, received the Florida Association of County Agricultural Agents Specialist of the Year Award, and was named University of Florida Department of Animal Science Graduate Student Mentor Awardee. His programs have received more than $9 million in grant funds or gifts. He has published more than 88 refereed journal articles, along with more than 370 extension and research reports. In addition, he has served as advisor or co-advisor to 15 graduate students and on the committees of another 14 students.

Larry Lanzon


James Lauderdale

James Lauderdale

James Lauderdale

Jim’s education was a bachelor of science degree from Auburn in 1962 and master of science and doctorate degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1964 and1968, respectively. He was a research scientist and research leader at The Upjohn Company (31 years). Research was directed at the biology and practical use of prostaglandin F2α to control the estrous cycle and parturition of domestic livestock (Lutalyse), enhancement of growth/feed efficiency of beef cattle (MGA), and bovine somatotropin to enhance milk yield efficiency of dairy cows.

Laudercdale has more than 90 major and more than 50 oral publications. He was president of American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) during 2002-2003, and Federation of Animal Science Societites (FASS) in 2004-2005. Awards include: Upjohn Research (1980), ASAS Physiology and Endocrinology (1986), Upjohn Achievement in Science and Medicine (1988), ASAS Fellow (2000), American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) Distinguished Service (2000) and ASAS Retiree Service (2008).

He served on the Michigan State University (MSU) Dairy Science Advisory Board from 1976 to 1982 and chaired the MSU AS Stakeholder Advisory Board from 2004 to 2009. He currently consults in animal health. He has been a member of the Applied Reproductive Strategies in Beef Cattle (ARSBC) Beef Reproduction Task Force (BRTF) and Beef Reproduction Leadership Team (BRLT) starting in 2004 and has participated in each of the ARSBC yearly programs since then.

Bret McNabb

Bret McNabb

Bret McNabb

Dr. Bret McNabb graduated from the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine in 2007, where he focused on large animal medicine. After graduation, he practiced in Dillon, Montana in a mixed large animal practice comprised of mostly beef cattle and equine work. He returned to UC Davis in 2009 and completed a residency in Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction, as well a Masters in Preventative Veterinary Medicine. Dr. McNabb became a board-certified Diplomate of the American College of Theriogenologists in 2012, and currently serves as the chief of the Livestock Herd Health and Reproduction Service in the UC Davis Large Animal Clinic.

David Patterson

George Perry

David Patterson

Dr. David Patterson is a member of the faculty in the Division of Animal Sciences at the University of Missouri (MU). Patterson, a native of Montana, completed his bachelor of science and master of science degrees at Montana State University. Research for his master's degree was conducted at the USDA Livestock and Range Research Laboratory in Miles City, Mont. Patterson received his doctorate in reproductive physiology from Kansas State University.

Patterson’s research efforts have gained wide industry acceptance, and resulted in new strategies to synchronize estrous cycles of postpartum beef cows and replacement beef heifers. Patterson’s research program received funding for the past 15 years from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s Competitive Grants Program, which led to the development of four progestin-based protocols to facilitate fixed-time artificial insemination in beef heifers and cows. Patterson led the development of Missouri’s Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program, which is the first comprehensive, state-wide, on-farm beef heifer development and marketing program in the United States. Participation in this program from 1997-2014 involved more than 800 farms, 250 veterinarians, 30 regional extension livestock specialists, and more than 130,000 heifers. The marketing component of the program facilitated the sale of more than 28,000 heifers in sales across Missouri from 1997 through the spring sales in 2015. Impact on Missouri’s economy from the past 18 years of this program exceeds $90 million. Patterson currently chairs the national Beef Reproduction Task Force and Beef Reproduction Leadership Team.

Patterson was recognized as the Man of the Year in Missouri Agriculture in 2001; was a past recipient of the American Society of Animal Science Extension and Animal Industry Service Awards in 2006 and 2007, respectively; the Beef Improvement Federation Continuing Service Award in 2010; the Frederick Mumford Outstanding Faculty Member in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources in 2012; the 2012 Research Award recipient presented by the National Association of Animal Breeders; the 2013 NIFA Partnership Award for Mission Integration of Research, Education, and Extension (Recognized by USDA NIFA for development and implementation of integrated research, Extension, and education programs that support improvements in beef production, reproduction and genetics); the 2013 NIFA Partnership Award for Multistate Efforts (Recognized by USDA NIFA for leadership in reproductive programming to the beef industry through cooperative Extension efforts); and the 2014 C. Brice Ratchford Memorial Fellowship Award, which recognizes a University of Missouri faculty member who demonstrates commitment, dedication and effectiveness in advancing the land-grant mission.

George Perry

George Perry

George Perry

Dr. George Perry was raised in south-central Texas on a small cattle operation. He received his bachelor’s degree in animal science from Texas A&M University. He obtained a master’s degree and a doctoral degree in reproductive physiology from the University of Missouri, with a large portion of his doctoral research conducted at the USDA research station in Miles City, Mont. Perry joined the faculty of South Dakota State University in August 2003. He now serves as a professor and the beef Extension specialist in reproductive physiology. His research efforts are in the area of factors that influence reproductive efficiency and pregnancy success. Some of his current research has focused on understanding why variation occurs between herds with fixed-time AI protocols.

Pablo Juan Ross

Eric Scholljegerdes

Pablo Juan Ross

Pablo Juan Ross is an Associate Professor in the Department of Animal Science at the University of California Davis. Pablo graduated from Veterinary School at the University of La Plata, Argentina. He then received a Master degree in Animal Science from the National Institute of Agricultural Technology and National University of Mar del Plata, Argentina where he worked on timed artificial insemination and in vitro embryo production. He then moved to Michigan State University where he obtained a PhD degree in Animal Science working on bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer-cloning. Pablo worked as a Research Assistant Professor at MSU for two years before joining the ANS department at UC Davis. His current research aims at understanding the mechanisms controlling preimplantation embryonic development and pluripotency for which he makes extensive use of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and genomics.

Eric Scholljegerdes

Eric Scholljegerdes

Eric Scholljegerdes

Dr. Eric Scholljegerdes is an Associate Professor at New Mexico State University in the Department of Animal and Range Sciences. He holds a PhD from the University of Wyoming and prior to coming to New Mexico in 2010, worked for 5 years at the USDA-ARS lab in Mandan, ND. Dr. Scholljegerdes’ research is focused on development of nutritional programs that enhance cow and calf productivity not only at the ranch but in the feedlot. These nutritional programs aim to enhance the development of the fetus by supplementing nutrients at key points during gestation in an effort to improve female progeny longevity and male progeny performance in the feedlot. New Mexico has been suffering from a devastating drought over the past few years. Dr. Scholljegerdes’ research has sought unique ways to maintain the cow herd on drought stricken ranches. In particular, he has focused on heifer development programs that reduce feed needs and decrease time to puberty. Furthermore, he has conducted research in the area of calf health with an emphasis on mineral nutrition and factors that impact vaccine efficacy.

Michael F. Smith

Michael F. Smith

Michael F. Smith

Michael F. Smith is a professor of animal sciences at the University of Missouri. He is a native of Michigan and graduated from Colorado State University with a bachelor of science degree in animal science. He received his master of science and doctorate degrees in reproductive physiology from Texas A&M University under the direction of James N. Wiltbank. In 1980 he joined the Division of Animal Sciences, where his academic responsibilities include research and undergraduate/graduate education. He served as interim director of the Division of Animal Sciences from 2001 to 2006. He was a visiting scientist at the Babraham Institute in Cambridge, England, and the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1996-1997.

Smith's current research is focused on identifying the factors regulating the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in beef cattle. He also works with Dr. Dave Patterson on the development of economical and effective methods for timed insemination in beef heifers and cows. Smith teaches two undergraduate courses (physiology of reproduction and reproductive management) and he team-teaches a graduate course (neuroendocrine and gonadal function). He and his wife own and operate a beef cattle farm, Windrush Farm, near Columbia, Mo.

Jeffrey Stott

Jeffrey Stott

Jeffrey Stott

Received the Bachelor of Science in Microbiology at Colorado State University in 1974 followed by a Master of Science in 1977 with thesis research directed at bluetongue virus infections in elk. Received the PhD in Microbiology at the University of California-Davis under the mentorship of Dr. Bennie Osburn and played an integral role in defining the epidemiology of bluetongue virus infection in California livestock and wildlife. Obtained a Young Investigator Award from the USDA in 1977 to pursue a study of the immunology of the bovine mammary gland and was appointed an Assistant Professor of Immunology at the University of CA’s School of Veterinary Medicine in 1985. Continued to study bluetongue virus and interests in diagnostic virology were expanded to include two years of research on African Horse Sickness virus at USDA’s Foreign Animal Disease Research Laboratory at Plum Island. Established an International Laboratory for Marine Mammal Immunology at UC-Davis with an emphasis on developing diagnostic techniques for assessing the immunologic health of captive and free-ranging marine mammals; such studies included establishing efficacy of an eyrsipelas vaccine for use in dolphins. Studies directed at identifying the etiologic agent of epizootic bovine abortion, commonly called foothill abortion, were initiated in 1983 with identification of the causative agent, a unique deltaproteobacterium, in 2005,. A candidate vaccine was successfully developed in 2010 with pivotal field safety and efficacy trials initiated in 2011. Currently Professor of Immunology and Director of the UC Laboratory for Marine Mammal Immunology at the School of Veterinary Medicine UC-Davis.

Alison Van Eenennaam

Alison Van Eenennaam

Alison Van Eenennaam

Alison Van Eenennaam is a cooperative extension specialist in the field of animal genomics and biotechnology in the Department of Animal Science at the University of California– Davis (UC–Davis). She received a bachelor of agricultural science from the University of Melbourne in Australia, and both a master's degree in animal science and a doctorate in genetics from UC–Davis. The mission of her extension program is to provide research and education on the use of animal genomics and biotechnology in livestock production systems.

Van Eenennaam works particularly with the beef cattle industry and has developed a variety of extension programming for producers on topics ranging from marker-assisted and whole-genome enabled selection to genetic engineering and cloning. Van Eenennaam was the recipient of the 2010 National Award for Excellence in Extension from the American Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities; the 2014 American Society of Animal Science National Extension Award; and the 2014 Borlaug CAST Communication Award.

Vish Vishwanath

Vish Vishwanath

Vish Vishwanath

Vish Vishwanath graduated with an master of science degree from Hyderabad, India, and a doctorate degree in veterinary physiology from the University of Sydney, Australia. He then worked for many years with Livestock Improvement a leading artificial breeding organization in New Zealand as a senior scientist, reserach and development (R&D) manager, as well as national operations manager. Following this, he took on the role of managing large and diverse research teams for AgResearch, a National Agricultural Research Institute in New Zealand. Vishwanath joined Sexing Technologies in 2011 as the global head of R&D. He is also an adjunct faculty member at the Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology at Texas A&M. His main area of specialization is sperm physiology and biochemistry.

Bryan Welly

Bryan Welly

Bryan Welly

With a desire to work in food animal production, Bryan received a B.S. in Animal Science at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. While at Cal Poly, he focused on beef cattle production with an emphasis in reproduction and genetics. He was extensively involved in the beef program at Cal Poly and was selected to be the 2011 bull test manager.

Upon completion of his Bachelor’s degree in 2012, he pursued a Master’s degree at the University of California, Davis in the laboratory of Dr. Alison Van Eenennaam. His masters’ research utilized next generation genomic technology to assemble and annotate the genome of the causative agent of Epizootic Bovine Abortion, commonly known as “foothill abortion”. Bryan continued research in Dr. Van Eenennaam’s lab after completing his Masters in 2014 to work on a project establishing the value of genomic selection in a vertically-integrated beef cattle production system.

Bryan will be attending the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine in the class of 2019. Bryan’s long term professional goals are to positively impact the production of beef and dairy cattle through a combination of clinical practice, large herd consultation, and extension education. He hopes to utilize his veterinary skills in conjunction with his knowledge of genomics to help cattle producers make improved genetic and reproductive decisions.